The sharepoint for young debates on history and identity

Year: 2014

History is personal! Interview with Children of the Revolution on the importance of 1989

1989 marked a change of epoch in Europe. Twenty-five years ago, the peaceful revolutions in Eastern Germany and Europe saw the fall of totalitarian regimes and borders. Like in a relay, the movements for freedom and independence in Central and Eastern Europe handed over the baton, with Poland starting in spring and Romania feeling the change in December. Depending on where they lived, Europeans' perceptions of one and the same year differ widely. Five young Europeans from the EUSTORY network explain what that year of change and the following time of political upheaval meant to them personally – besides the fact they all have in common: 1989 is their year of birth. Helena Ursic from Slovenia, Milan Vukasinovic from Serbia, Vlad Baldea from Romania, Ivor Onksion from Estonia and Ju...Read More

Is history an obstacle to future peace building?

Daniel Gjokjeski (28) from Macedonia summed up his impressions from some events he attended recently, all reflecting possible ways of fostering peace in the Western Balkans. Daniel asks the vital question: How much are we truly willing to change ourselves and accept otherness as a pre-condition for peace?

“The absence of war is far from being peace“

There are so many present problems and pressing issues which are linked to World War I, the prime catastrophe of the 20th century. At the same time it shows that hardly anyone learns from history. Haris Huremagić (20), a prize winner of the Austrian history competition, has a Bosnian Background and demands honest efforts of modernization for Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

War crimes in Tuscany in 1944 – an historical exploration

A group of young German and Italian students met in Castelnuovo Berardenga in Tuscany for eight days of intensive digging into a dark chapter of the local German-Italian history: The German massacre at the end of World War II. Read the impressions by Lanrianna Peters (17).

The »Concept of Trust« as a determining factor in Norwegian politics and society

Twenty-three young Europeans from 12 countries met in Oslo for the Eustory History Camp “National Constitutions and European Democracies in Times of Crisis”. Read how participant Jan Schmelter (19) reflects on what he learned about the “Concept of Trust” as a determining factor in Norwegian politics and society.

@work in Norway: Europe@Debate

Twenty-three young Europeans from 12 countries met in Oslo for the Eustory History Camp "National Constitutions and European Democracies in Times of Crisis". Read here from their daily blog. Day 5: Time to put everything in perspective

@work in Norway: Exploring Norwegian history

Twenty-three young Europeans from 12 countries met in Oslo for the Eustory History Camp "National Constitutions and European Democracies in Times of Crisis". Read here from their daily blog. Day 4: Exploring Norwegian history, from the Vikings to the first constitution

Day 4: Exploring Norwegian history

Have you ever seen zombies? If not, take a group of people that were dancing all night long and make them go to breakfast at 7 a.m. That would be the perfect definition of what happened today. Somehow we managed to be at the bus station by 8 a.m. to visit Eidsvoll, a historical place you can’t miss studying the Norwegian constitution. After having long talks about our European constitutions it was now time to discover the Norwegian one in practice. Before having the guided tour we couldn’t resist taking pictures with the real-size participants of the assembly in Eidsvoll and we basically transformed ourselves into 1814. To make the pictures more interesting we took them according to our nationalities. The guided tour started with us having to put funny socks on in order not to ruin the flo...Read More

@work in Norway: #BEDEMOCRACY

Twenty-three young Europeans from 12 countries met in Oslo for the Eustory History Camp "National Constitutions and European Democracies in Times of Crisis". Read here from their daily blog. Day 3: #BEDEMOCRACY – Constitutions in Europe and how to get involved in Democracy  

Day 3: #BEDEMOCRACY

Today we started with an exchange about constitutions. We worked in groups and we discussed the differences and similarities of our countries‘ constitutions. By exchanging and discussing we worked out key elements of our constitutions; elements that we could find in all constitutions, only with different priorities. With the help of Karsten, the Norwegian organiser and a historian, who gave a presentation about Norway we familiarized ourselves with the fascinating Norwegian history. For example it was a surprise to find out that Norway was given to Sweden as a gift after Napoleon wars. After lunch we went for a short walk in Oslo and got to know the city better. Starting in a part of Oslo which ist mostly populated by inhabitans with Somalian background, passing by a street festival with l...Read More

Simulating politics: City council meeting in Sleepyville

How hard it can be to come to a consensus when different political interests are involved was the lesson of this afternoon. The participants of our History Campus had to simulate a city council meeting where they had to decide whether a mosque should be built in the fictive town of Sleepyville. One Mayor, 4 parties and 5 civic society institutions debated and voted in the end. Luckily for us, three journalist were present and working in real time. You can read their reports here      

@work in Norway: Politics; real and simulated

Twenty-three young Europeans from 12 countries met in Oslo for the Eustory History Camp "National Constitutions and European Democracies in Times of Crisis". Read here from their daily blog. Day 2: Trust works! Learning about the Norwegian democracy @work and simulating politics themselves