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@work between Prague and Gdansk, Day 5: On the trace of social movements and people’s uprisings

@work between Prague and Gdansk, Day 5: On the trace of social movements and people’s uprisings

After two days in Prague our history “campers” felt the need to move again. This time they followed the traces of social movements and people’s uprisings to the north and ended in the city of Gdansk. How they spent and finished their second day in Prague and how they entertained themselves on their trip is presented in today’s blog entry – check it out!

Our Tuesday, still in Prague, started with getting some more journalistic education on writing articles, personal opinions and reviews. Thus, our Višegrad backpackers got valuable tips for their future journalistic adventures, which were put to practice already in the afternoon of the same day. Tips on traditional journalistic formats were later broadened with presentation of newer, more modern and inovative media formats, introduced and published on the History Campus platform. Nineteen young history »campers« learned about the strange sounding formats and categories such as History to go, Where were you when… ?, What If GIF, European street beat and Memory suitcases (to get an idea what these names actually represent, take a look at the History Campus platform – seriously, it is worth checking ;)).

Full of new and refreshed knowledge, the young campers seized the day with going out to the sunny and rather touristically crowded streets of charming Prague, gathering material to contribute to the uncommon journalistic categories and of course to broaden their knowledge about the current »street beat« of Prague.

Working on the stories, gathered on the streets of Prague (Source: Eustory).

Learning and mastering in video-making (Source: Eustory).

From conversations and recordings to GIF’s and movies

Hard work on the streets and squares paid off in form of an abundance of opinions, photos, and facial reactions gathered, which enabled them to continue their work of transforming all that into videos, GIFs and articles (follow our blog and the History Campus also after the end of the Višegrad History Camp to see them published).

Interested looks towards the video, just created by the group (Source: Eustory).

As usually during projects involving smart, young, ready-to-learn and interested people, group work turned out to be very productive, educational, and also a lot of fun. In the meantime issues with the internet connection took care for some more dynamic and unusual work-spots (stairs proved to be just as good as a regular office-desk).

Who needs a desk, when you have stairs? (Source: Eustory).

Don’t cry for me… Prague

We said goodbye to Prague (and promised to return – which you already know if you tuned in into our Facebook live-stream – every day at 9 PM) in style with dinning in an old Prague restaurant, where we enjoyed beautiful live piano music along with the delicious food.

A proper goodbye to Prague with enjoying dinner in an old Prague restaurant (Source: Eustory).

However, in order not to clinge just to the past, we used the last chance of a goof wi-fi connection to equip ourselves with a more current form of entertainment – with the first round of the USA’s presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Night train entertainment provided by Clinton and Trump presidential campaigns (Source: Eustory).

Ready for new adventures in a new country, we hopped on a tram (well, honestly, our luggage made us a bit less »hoppy«), which took us to Praha hlavní nádraží, where we boarded a night train to Poland. While we were sleeping, and our brains were processing all the information we got in Budapest and Prague, and also chewing on what we just heard and saw in the American presidential debate, we crossed the border and entered Poland. However, more on our Polish adventures in the tomorrow’s blog post – stay tuned and scroll down to read some of the impressions from our participants 😉

Going north – next stop: Gdansk (Source: Eustory).

Anastasija, Latvia

»Yesterday was a good experience for me and my group,. We did exciting work, going to the center of Prague and talking with people there.«

 Irina, Russia

»I walked the streets of Prague with Eva, and it was really interesting to listen to the Czech language. It was of course hard to understand people, but it still made a good walk, because we got to know people’s feelings about the communist part of the Czech history.«

Elena, Spain

»I had a great time in the city, hanging out with people, learning about journalism and having an experience I never had before and never expected. It is a unique experience I will never forget.«

Fedir, Ukraine

»Well, the most memorable thing about the last day in Prague was how people on the streets talked to us. They were not very polite, which is unusual, and it made our journalistic task really hard, harder than imagined.«

Elin, Wales

»I really enjoyed yesterday. It was very interesting to interview people and getting lost in Prague – that was the best thing, since it was nice to have some free time there J I also really enjoyed our dinner.«

Karl-Martin, Estonia

»Unlike Elin, I did not get lost, I had a map. So far Prague is my favourite city in the world, so it was very nice to be there and to walk across my favourite bridge. The food was very good too, it was nice to eat traditional Czech food. And of course, watching the presidential debate until the early morning hours was also very interesting.«

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Tamara (1990) comes from Slovenia, where she finished her bachelor in International relations and is currently doing her master in Management. To balance the more theoretical part she fills her free time with drawing, creating with wood and travelling.

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