History Campus

A Second Look at Right Wing Poland

For many, xenophobia in Poland primarly seems to be connected to its recent increase. By talking to Polish peers, our author Paweł experienced that the issue is much more complex than it appears at first glance. Looking at the current political situation in Poland, the thoughts and actions of both, the populist right wing and the conservative party seem to appeal to a big part of the Polish society. Where does this phenomenon come from and how does this affect young students from abroad in their everyday lives?

Pretty in Pink

As kids we perceive things differently. Music sounds special and there is no better taste than the one of candy. There are some things we see through rose-coloured glasses, one could say. But while growing up, the glasses lose their colour, many things become clearer and more important than the taste of candies. However, for our author Trixi there is one item that hasn’t lost any pinkness over time – in fact, quite the opposite.

#livingMünster: The “Heart of Europe” and its Positive Vibes

  For young people across Europe the ERASMUS+ Programme is the chance to experience other Europeans countries first hand. Camilla, a law student from Italy, thinks this is one of the EU’s greatest achievements. Back from two years studying in Germany, she reflects on the opportunities and challenges of her stay in Germany, about her discovery of another culture, about #livingMünster.

Happy Birthday, Google! Can the Search Engine Replace History Teachers and Libraries?

What is our first thought when we don’t know something? “Just Google it up!”. Google will celebrate its 20th birthday this year and it is undeniable that the search engine occupies a prominent role in our lives. But could Google (and technology in general) go further and completely replace libraries, archives or even teachers by becoming the sole instrument to research, teach and learn history? Could Google rearrange our knowledge about the past with their untransparent algorithm? Camilla Crovella from Italy reflects on these questions, after attending the Eustory Annual meeting in Turin on these topics. Researching is a fundamental human activity. Even if some of us would not admit it, nowadays most of us look first on Google to find something we don’t know. The largest search engine in t...[Read More]

From South to North: new-old European winter-time recipes

After having shared a first collection of European recipes and connected memories two years ago, here is a new, special Memory Suitcase for you, again filled with cookies, cakes and personal stories from Europe. We hope some stories will make you laugh, and that some will keep you warm during the cold winter days. Have a go, fill these recipes with life and test your baking skills. And if you’re proud of your results, share some photos of your Christmas baking with us!

Editors’ Diary. Some days in the life of a History Campus-Editor

Every December, the History Campus is calling for new members of its Editors Group. You want to know what the work of a History Campus-Editor looks like? Gregor, Editor since 2015, gives some insights into a typical month of an Editor. In case of any questions do not hesitate to comment below!

The “re-unification” belt. When human solidarity overcomes military division.

Remembering World War II is difficult in many countries. In Italy, however, the narration of “us” against “them” is even more difficult, since the country was not occupied by enemies, but Benito Mussolini was a strong ally of Hitler’s Germany even before the war. Only when a new government ousted Mussolini in 1943, German army occupied Northern Italy. In this part of the country, partisans raised and fought to release their country. Camilla Crovella’s family keeps a personal treasure as memory of those fights. When my grandfather and his sister are describing this two years of occupation, known as the “Resistance”, they mention a general atmosphere of fear, poverty and lack of information. My grandfather was a primary school student during war times, his sister already was in h...[Read More]

The sound of childhood

Grandma’s old record player and a collection of vinyl records, encompassing variety of genres, from poems, operas to pop songs, gave sound to Elena’s early childhood in Russia. And how does a memory of your childhood sound like?

Kaliningrad: A model region?

Citizens of the Russian exclave Kaliningrad make a special case in the Russian-Polish relationship. Paulina Siegień regularly crosses the border between these two worlds, working for the local media in Kaliningrad, as well as in Gdansk on the Polish side. She spoke to young Europeans from the EUSTORY network about the current tensions between the two countries and their impact on the region.

Where were you when…9/11 happened?

Today marks the fifteenth year since two planes were directed into the World Trade Center in New York City, starting the war on terror and marking a date has been a clear day-to-day change in history. 9/11. For the first time, this year junior year high schoolers will be taught about the act as a historical event that they weren’t yet alive to witness.

“People were afraid to shake our hands”

“Who, except ecologists, even still talks about it?” is a valid question Elena exposes in her article and sheds a light on the variety of perspectives and attitudes people in Belarus nowadays have towards the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. The spectrum of attitudes extends itself from experiencing the accident’s aftermath and being afraid to shake people’s hands up to today’s indifference towards the accident – and where do you find yourself?

The shadow of Chernobyl in Ukraine – from secrets to facts

From keeping the tragedy a secret in the USSR to commemorating and revealing secret information about the exposure in independent Ukraine – this is how the discussion about Chernobyl shifted throughout the years.

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