The sharepoint for young debates on history and identity

Europe

#livingMünster: The “Heart of Europe” and its Positive Vibes

For young people across Europe the ERASMUS+ Programme is the chance to experience other Europeans countries first hand. Camilla, a law student from Italy, thinks this is one of the EU’s greatest achievements. Back from two years studying in Germany, she reflects on the opportunities and challenges of her stay in Germany, about her discovery of another culture, about #livingMünster.

What if … you were drafted to defend your country tomorrow?

Over one hundred years ago, many of our ancestors couldn´t wait to fight for their country. Some even volunteered to go to the front. With the memory of two world wars and countless military conflicts, the attitude towards defending your country as a soldier might have changed. We asked participants of the EUSTORY Next Generation Summit how they would react if they were drafted to defend their country now.

Happy Birthday, Google! Can the Search Engine Replace History Teachers and Libraries?

What is our first thought when we don’t know something? “Just Google it up!”. Google will celebrate its 20th birthday this year and it is undeniable that the search engine occupies a prominent role in our lives. But could Google (and technology in general) go further and completely replace libraries, archives or even teachers by becoming the sole instrument to research, teach and learn history? Could Google rearrange our knowledge about the past with their untransparent algorithm? Camilla Crovella from Italy reflects on these questions, after attending the Eustory Annual meeting in Turin on these topics. Researching is a fundamental human activity. Even if some of us would not admit it, nowadays most of us look first on Google to find something we don’t know. The largest search engine in t...[Read More]

From South to North: new-old European winter-time recipes

After having shared a first collection of European recipes and connected memories two years ago, here is a new, special Memory Suitcase for you, again filled with cookies, cakes and personal stories from Europe. We hope some stories will make you laugh, and that some will keep you warm during the cold winter days. Have a go, fill these recipes with life and test your baking skills. And if you’re proud of your results, share some photos of your Christmas baking with us!

Editors’ Diary. Some days in the life of a History Campus-Editor

Every December, the History Campus is calling for new members of its Editors Group. You want to know what the work of a History Campus-Editor looks like? Gregor, Editor since 2015, gives some insights into a typical month of an Editor. In case of any questions do not hesitate to comment below!

Catalonia: Outbreak of illegal nationalism or oppression of a democratic movement?

People being beaten up by the police just for trying to vote, a government which declares a referendum binding even though parts of the electorate where not able to vote and a large number of ballots where confiscated, and finally nearly the whole democratic elected government either in prison or in exile – the events around the Catalan independence referendum where unexpected and incomparable to any political development the old EU member states experienced since the end of the dictatorships in the South. Camilla Crovella from Italy tries to find explanations for these developments and looks also for future solutions by asking students both from Catalonia and Spain about their views and opinions. Joaquim Candel (22), Economics student from Barcelona and active member of the Catalan Moveme...[Read More]

What was most inspiring at the Summit so far?

Jonas, Denmark Sara, Slovenia Ronja, Germany Florian, Germany Bohdana, Yuliia & Krystyna, Ukraine Andreas, Belgium  

Why is history important to you?

Driven by their passion for history more than 100 young Europeans made their way to Berlin, against all odds: storm Xavier devastated northern parts of Germany cutting of train connections to the German capital. Five participants told us why history is important to them.  Anete Kalnina, Latvia   Elvira Kinzhaeva, Russia   Andreas Theys, Belgium   Sarah Scott, Ireland   Pauline Husemann, Germany                  

Heroes of freedom – An important anniversary in the fight against Mafia

Mafia has always been a strong presence in the Italian country. Some Italians, instead of accepting the situation, raised their head and proved that Mafia can be defeated with a constant fight for legality. Among them were the two magistrates Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, murdered by the organised criminality 25 years ago. Viola Berti, a young Italian, describes the importance of the Anniversary and the two men’s legacy for her and in contemporary Italy. As a young Italian citizen, I often hear my country addressed abroad as the homeland of Mafia, criminality and corruption. The last out of several times was around a month ago. Some American friends I met during my vacation in England told me that the Italians invented the organised criminality and exported it around the world. Th...[Read More]

The “re-unification” belt. When human solidarity overcomes military division.

Remembering World War II is difficult in many countries. In Italy, however, the narration of “us” against “them” is even more difficult, since the country was not occupied by enemies, but Benito Mussolini was a strong ally of Hitler’s Germany even before the war. Only when a new government ousted Mussolini in 1943, German army occupied Northern Italy. In this part of the country, partisans raised and fought to release their country. Camilla Crovella’s family keeps a personal treasure as memory of those fights. When my grandfather and his sister are describing this two years of occupation, known as the “Resistance”, they mention a general atmosphere of fear, poverty and lack of information. My grandfather was a primary school student during war times, his sister already was in h...[Read More]

Stuck in the “Brussels Bubble”?

Brexit, Orbán and Le Pen. European right wing populism and state egotism is on the rise, the EU threatened by dissolution and there is no end in sight. What has gone wrong in the last years? How can the European Union get back on track? For Enja from Norway the EU bureaucrats have been detached from reality and ignored working class people for too long…

“An Austrian woman with a French family is drinking a Soviet champagne…”

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Iron Curtain not only had immense political implications for Europe, but for many also on a personal level. For Eleonore Dupuis it meant to eventually get the chance to search for her father, a former Soviet soldier in occupied Austria.