interview

Abortion in Ireland: The Upcoming Referendum

Pro-Choice or Pro-Life? This divisive question concerning women’s reproductive rights is taking centre-stage in Europe: In March 2018, ten thousands took to the streets in Poland protesting against the toughening of the already strictest abortion laws in Europe. At the same time in Germany a heated discussion is going on about the laws governing the access to reliable and neutral information on the termination of unwanted pregnancies. And in Ireland, the government will hold a referendum on 25 May 2018 concerning the repeal or retention of the Eighth Amendment, which only allows terminations of pregnancies if the life of the mother is in danger. Our author Sarah Scott interviewed three 18-year-old Irish students about the upcoming referendum in Ireland, the influence of the Catholic Church...[Read More]

Catalonia: Outbreak of illegal nationalism or oppression of a democratic movement?

People being beaten up by the police just for trying to vote, a government which declares a referendum binding even though parts of the electorate where not able to vote and a large number of ballots where confiscated, and finally nearly the whole democratic elected government either in prison or in exile – the events around the Catalan independence referendum where unexpected and incomparable to any political development the old EU member states experienced since the end of the dictatorships in the South. Camilla Crovella from Italy tries to find explanations for these developments and looks also for future solutions by asking students both from Catalonia and Spain about their views and opinions. Joaquim Candel (22), Economics student from Barcelona and active member of the Catalan Moveme...[Read More]

Food and Faith: Practising religion during the Summit

Going to the synagogue three times a day, praying with a branch of a palm tree and eating kosher food. Orthodox Judaism demands many rules to be obeyed. Shahar from Israel, an orthodox Jew himself, explains how he managed to keep his lifestyle while attending the EUSTORY Summit:    

What was most inspiring at the Summit so far?

Jonas, Denmark Sara, Slovenia Ronja, Germany Florian, Germany Bohdana, Yuliia & Krystyna, Ukraine Andreas, Belgium  

Why is history important to you?

Driven by their passion for history more than 100 young Europeans made their way to Berlin, against all odds: storm Xavier devastated northern parts of Germany cutting of train connections to the German capital. Five participants told us why history is important to them.  Anete Kalnina, Latvia   Elvira Kinzhaeva, Russia   Andreas Theys, Belgium   Sarah Scott, Ireland   Pauline Husemann, Germany                  

Where Were You When…the Bosnian War Began?

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the beginning of the Bosnian war. In April 1992, after the Bosnian parliament declared independence from what remained of former Yugoslavia, Serb forces began to siege the city of Sarajevo. The war soon spread across the country and lasted over three-and-a-half years and claimed more than 100 000 victims. We asked people from Bosnia and Serbia to share their memories about the beginning of the war. 

#CallSerbia: Presidential elections: A »white knight« challenging the system?

This year’s presidential elections on April 2nd in Serbia are getting quite peculiar. In the time when nationalist and populist movements are on the rise, Serbia has a wacky situation with a fictional candidate being the unexpected challenge for the ruling party, ranking high in opinion polls. What do young people think about the candidates and how do they see Serbian future? We are activating our European network and asking three young voters to explain their choice. According to all estimates indisputable winner of elections will be current prime minister Vucic from the Serbian Progressive Party (SNS) . He opened his campaign with a video that quickly became viral on social networks. It shows him as  a passenger in a plane flown by two pilots fighting around the steering wheel, bec...[Read More]

#CallBulgaria: Backwards to the Future or On the Train of Unkept Promises

On 26th March Bulgarians are electing their parlament members. Convened  earlier than originally scheduled, as a consequence of the prime-minister Boyko Borisov’s resignation, the elections are preceded by a campaign that has turned into a real political battle between the major parties in Bulgaria. As an addition, a quite controversial businessman, Veselin Mareshki, whom The New York Times compared to Trump for his provocative statements and intentions for a complete change of the political situation, is also entering the race for Parliament with his party “VOLYA” (WILL). Whether the candidates’ promises are real or just a way to become members of the next Parliament, has to be seen after the elections. What do young people think and expect from it? I asked Ana Maria, Yoan and Maria about...[Read More]

“An Austrian woman with a French family is drinking a Soviet champagne…”

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Iron Curtain not only had immense political implications for Europe, but for many also on a personal level. For Eleonore Dupuis it meant to eventually get the chance to search for her father, a former Soviet soldier in occupied Austria.

Rallying for the Reconquista – Incognito among the Identitarians

After a long camapaign the Austrian Voters finally elected Alexander von der Bellen as new president. The candidate of the far right party FPÖ, Norbert Hofer, got more than 46 percent of the vote. With this the FPÖ, a party which is strongly connected with the new emerging right wing movement of the Identiarians, has found its path into the centre of the Austrian society. But who are the Identitarians? What do they stand for and how will this change the Austrian society?

Kings of War and Servants of Peace

  Hundreds of thousands of refugees have passed through Serbia this year. Two Serbian activists, the Kontrapress journalist Žarka Radoja (40) and the psychologist and therapist Ana Perović (27) tell about their first-hand encounters with refugees on wheel chairs and everyday work…  

”That is the great void that affected me throughout my entire childhood.”

Michaela Vidláková did not have the childhood you would wish to have. She and her parents were imprisoned in Terezín (Theresienstadt), because they were Jews. They were lucky; the three of them survived, but exclusion and internment strongly shaped Michaela’s attitude towards life. Haris Huremagić had the chance for an interview.

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