The sharepoint for young debates on history and identity

journalism

Happy Birthday, Google! Can the search engine replace history teachers and libraries?

What is our first thought when we don’t know something? “Just Google it up!”. Google will celebrate its 20th birthday this year and it is undeniable that the search engine occupies a prominent role in our lives. But could Google (and technology in general) go further and completely replace libraries, archives or even teachers by becoming the sole instrument to research, teach and learn history? Could Google rearrange our knowledge about the past with their untransparent algorithm? Camilla Crovella from Italy reflects on these questions, after attending the Eustory Annual meeting in Turin on these topics. Researching is a fundamental human activity. Even if some of us would not admit it, nowadays most of us look first on Google to find something we don’t know. The largest search engine in t...[Read More]

Catalonia: Outbreak of illegal nationalism or oppression of a democratic movement?

People being beaten up by the police just for trying to vote, a government which declares a referendum binding even though parts of the electorate where not able to vote and a large number of ballots where confiscated, and finally nearly the whole democratic elected government either in prison or in exile – the events around the Catalan independence referendum where unexpected and incomparable to any political development the old EU member states experienced since the end of the dictatorships in the South. Camilla Crovella from Italy tries to find explanations for these developments and looks also for future solutions by asking students both from Catalonia and Spain about their views and opinions. Joaquim Candel (22), Economics student from Barcelona and active member of the Catalan Moveme...[Read More]

@work in Gdansk, day 7: Switching the roles – interviewing the usual interviewers

On their second day in Gdansk, our participants realized that the “Backpacking Višegrad” History Camp is slowly coming to an end. Saddened by this fact, but highly motivated, they began their day that promised interviews, media archives, a library… and ended with a very unique public performance.

@work in Gdansk, day 6: Learning about solidarity and bloody pacifications of protests

Wednesday is the day for starting a new, this time Polish, adventure in the city of Gdansk. The first day in Gdansk included four interesting and inspiring interviews, a visit to the Solidarity centre’s library and their archive, where our participants looked at, touched and explored the leaflets, posters and other interesting documents, produced by the Solidarnosc movement.

@work between Prague and Gdansk, Day 5: On the trace of social movements and people’s uprisings

After two days in Prague our history “campers” felt the need to move again. This time they followed the traces of social movements and people’s uprisings to the north and ended in the city of Gdansk. How they spent and finished their second day in Prague and how they entertained themselves on their trip is presented in today’s blog entry – check it out!

Simulating politics: City council meeting in Sleepyville

How hard it can be to come to a consensus when different political interests are involved was the lesson of this afternoon. The participants of our History Campus had to simulate a city council meeting where they had to decide whether a mosque should be built in the fictive town of Sleepyville. One Mayor, 4 parties and 5 civic society institutions debated and voted in the end. Luckily for us, three journalist were present and working in real time. You can read their reports here