Poland

A Second Look at Right Wing Poland

For many, xenophobia in Poland primarly seems to be connected to its recent increase. By talking to Polish peers, our author Paweł experienced that the issue is much more complex than it appears at first glance. Looking at the current political situation in Poland, the thoughts and actions of both, the populist right wing and the conservative party seem to appeal to a big part of the Polish society. Where does this phenomenon come from and how does this affect young students from abroad in their everyday lives?

A Map of Friendship

During international seminars and History Camps you can meet people from all over Europe and form intense friendships. After these events distance and new circumstances sometimes present a challenge, even for the closest friendships. In his MEMORY SUITCASE Phillip shares his experience in making cross-border friendships and reconnecting with them years later. A hand-made paper map became a symbol of this friendship.

Polish-Czech relations: Stereotypes, mistrust and misunderstandings put into practise

Last year Polish historian Michal Przeperski published his first book Unbearable Burden of Brotherhood. The book deals with Polish-Czech conflicts in the 20th century but takes also a more thorough look on the background of the troublesome relations of these two nations. The conflicts between Poles and Czechs are numerous, but in the name of learning from the past we wanted to ask Michal, is there something to learn from this quarrelsome history. In his opinion there is – and it’s a quite simple one.

The making-of: Bulgaria’s populist revolt

Looking at the political situations in various countries around the globe, one can get a feeling that once more a specific trend is on the rise. Namely, populism. Following the trend-setters in form of Hungary, Poland and the USA, there is a growing fear that Bulgaria might be the next populist trend-victim. Have a look of how the fear of “the Other”, combined with Bulgaria’s own fake news and alternative facts created populism’s perfect breeding ground.

The Moral Compass

With freedom of press endangered in many parts of Europe and the work of independent journalists becoming harder and harder we wanted to know first hand what it is like to work as a journalist with an interest in human rights and female empowerment in today’s Poland. Five of our young journalists met Iwona Reichard, Deputy Editor and Lead Translator of the New Eastern Europe in Gdańsk and talked with her about the media landscape in Poland and journalistic values/ethics.

Kaliningrad: A model region?

Citizens of the Russian exclave Kaliningrad make a special case in the Russian-Polish relationship. Paulina Siegień regularly crosses the border between these two worlds, working for the local media in Kaliningrad, as well as in Gdansk on the Polish side. She spoke to young Europeans from the EUSTORY network about the current tensions between the two countries and their impact on the region.

@work in Gdansk, day 6: Learning about solidarity and bloody pacifications of protests

Wednesday is the day for starting a new, this time Polish, adventure in the city of Gdansk. The first day in Gdansk included four interesting and inspiring interviews, a visit to the Solidarity centre’s library and their archive, where our participants looked at, touched and explored the leaflets, posters and other interesting documents, produced by the Solidarnosc movement.

From Homeland to Home.

Can you imagine going to the toilet in the middle of the night and seeing something that will change your life and your country forever? The 8th of May marks the 71st anniversary of the end of the Second World War in Europe, and Mr Chojcknaki shares his memories about the Second World War and how it changed him and where he called home.

Shifting borders – changing lives

2014 marks the Centenary of the First World War, a war that changed Europe as it was and had huge consequences for millions of people. Once great and extensive multinational empires slowly shrank in the course of history and new nation states were created. People living on the very same territory sometimes changed their citizenships multiple times due to the often changing border-lines. Some decided to stay and accept their new citizenship, while others decided to migrate; to follow the sometimes very elusive border-line in order to once again live inside the borders of that country, which represents the fundamental part of their national identity. In preparation of the centenary young Europeans met during seminars in Finland, Spain and Slovenia and discussed the consequences of WWI for th...[Read More]

„A farewell to Poland, a farewell to Russia. The history of three Polish-Russian marriages.”

Estera Sendecka Born in 1993, Kraków, Poland High school graduate, future Inter-Faculty Individual Studies in the Humanities student (Jagiellonian University) Topic of the 2011/2012 Polish History Competition: Poles and Russians in the 20th Century – Recorded and Effaced Stories Estera’s Research Topic: „A farewell to Poland, a farewell to Russia. The history of three Polish-Russian marriages.” (2011) Part 1 – Summary I wrote the story of three Polish-Russian marriages in the 20th century: Luba and Czeslaw £otarewicz, Larysa and Peter Kaczmarczyk, Catherine and George Sendeckij. Czeslaw £otarewicz, a Pole, was a soldier in the Home Army, the dominant Polish resistance movement in occupied Poland during World War II. He was imprisoned in 1944 and sentenced to serve 25 years in the cam...[Read More]

Freedom in Europe: Equal opportunities?

During the workshop ‘Desire for Freedom’ Mare from Estonia conducted an interview with Sofia (Finland), Sławomir (Poland) and Darya (Belarus) How do you feel about the situation of freedom in your country? How is it restrained? Sofia: Excellent. Not only are the human rights guaranteed to a great extent, I think we have one of the closest things to equal opportunity as well. Sławomir: I think there is a lot of freedom in my country, but on the other hand people are not taught how to use it. There have been some bad times that have shown, that not everyone’s freedom is accepted by the society. But I guess we are heading in a good direction. Darya: In our country, we are in some ways restricted. Not everybody is free. The restriction of the freedom of expression, the impossibilit...[Read More]