The sharepoint for young debates on history and identity

War

Where Were You When… the war in Ukraine began?

The conflict between Ukraine and Russia is back on the international agenda. We are looking back to the beginnings: Voices of young Ukrainians directly affected by war.

What if … you were drafted to defend your country tomorrow?

Over one hundred years ago, many of our ancestors couldn´t wait to fight for their country. Some even volunteered to go to the front. With the memory of two world wars and countless military conflicts, the attitude towards defending your country as a soldier might have changed. We asked participants of the EUSTORY Next Generation Summit how they would react if they were drafted to defend their country now.

Heroes of freedom – An important anniversary in the fight against Mafia

Mafia has always been a strong presence in the Italian country. Some Italians, instead of accepting the situation, raised their head and proved that Mafia can be defeated with a constant fight for legality. Among them were the two magistrates Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, murdered by the organised criminality 25 years ago. Viola Berti, a young Italian, describes the importance of the Anniversary and the two men’s legacy for her and in contemporary Italy. As a young Italian citizen, I often hear my country addressed abroad as the homeland of Mafia, criminality and corruption. The last out of several times was around a month ago. Some American friends I met during my vacation in England told me that the Italians invented the organised criminality and exported it around the world. Th...[Read More]

Where Were You When…the Bosnian War Began?

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the beginning of the Bosnian war. In April 1992, after the Bosnian parliament declared independence from what remained of former Yugoslavia, Serb forces began to siege the city of Sarajevo. The war soon spread across the country and lasted over three-and-a-half years and claimed more than 100 000 victims. We asked people from Bosnia and Serbia to share their memories about the beginning of the war. 

When the Tanks Broke Free

Marching soldiers, cheering crowds, tanks and cannon fire. The martial and enthusiastic manner of the May 9 parade in St. Petersburg, celebrating the victory over Nazi-Germany and the end of World War II, reminded Daniela, who is spending a voluntary social year in Russia, of the horror of war, triggering tears of fear and an intense stream of thoughts. 

Divide and rule

Setting up state systems based on ethnicity or race can have positive effects argued Martin on the example of Singapore. However, dividing a people accordingly can have severe consequences for the social cohesion too, affecting school children as much as the political elites. The case of Bosnia-Herzegovina…

1989 – (R)Evolution, Its Parents and Its Children

Milan, originally from Serbia, reflects different perspectives on his year of birth 1989 and the following process of a unifying, but also a dividing Europe. While what we called East and West was coming together, the Balkans had to struggle with war. The author describes a crack of the generation gap he found himself in and asks the question: Can people who created a ‘dream Europe’ in 1989 and those whom they created it for write their personal history together? Children of the revolution?

Where do I belong to? The issue of identity of war children in post-war societies

The first victims in every war are the children. Milena, a 28 year old student from Serbia, is interested in the long shadows of World War II on people who had experiences it being young. From the panelists of a Remembrance Day in Berlin she wanted to know: What could it mean for a war-child to be claimed, integrated, ignored or made silent in post-war societies? “In the social jungle of human existence, there is no feeling of being alive without a sense of identity.” Erik Erikson

Hilda’s voyage: An amazing trip during Second World War?!

Since months the fate of thousands of refugees on boats calls for a European solution. How different the fate of a refugee on a boat could turn out reveals Hilda Ketels. As a twelve-year-old she escaped the German invasion of Belgium in 1940 on the passenger and cargo ship SS Albertville. She told her story to our author Thomas Dirven 74 years later.